Jetfire Narcissus
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Narcissus ‘Jetfire’

Narcissus Tete-a-Tete and Jack Snipe
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Narcissus ‘Jack Snipe’ in front of a clump of the most popular narcissus in the world: Tete-a-Tete. To right (not flowering): Prostanthera cuneata and, to left, the marbled foliage of Cyclamen hederifolium.

Daphne odora
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A nice, plain green-leafed form of Daphne odora.

Daphne odora 'Alba'
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Daphne odora ‘Alba’ – a nice break from the typical pink type.

Double hellebore
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Helleborus x hybridus – I got this double form about five years ago – it’s still my favorite, even with all the new splendid hybrids that are now available.

Crocus tommasinianus
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The last of my little purple Crocus tommasinianus – probably Whitewell Purple.

Iris unguicularis
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This Algerian iris (Iris unguicularis) has been flowering all winter. The flowers are great in a tiny vase – they last best if you tug them up instead of cutting them. The fragrance is sweet and powdery, very evocative… perhaps of an Algerian hillside in winter.

Chaenomeles Atsuya Hamada
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This is the best dark red flowering quince I’ve seen yet, with large, silky, cupped flowers that are the color of blood. Here’s a bee’s view, from above. Notice the handsome evergreen growing below it?

Ribes aff wilsonii DJHC 777
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A close-up of the handsome evergreen plant I grow beneath the blood-red flowering quince… it’s a type of creeping, evergreen currant from China. Collected by Daniel J. Hinkley in China, it goes by the name of Ribes aff wilsonii DJHC 777 because it is a Ribes with an affinity (similarity) to R. wilsonii (doesn’t seem to be anything else) and it was a Daniel J. Hinkley Collection #777 (a busy collecting trip for Mr. Hinkley!). That’s just for anyone who might have wondered why the plant has such a silly-sounding name. Okay, best part is… if you really squint and make this picture as big as possible on your screen, you can see the microscopic green, red-rimmed flowers that I have fastidiously matched to the blood-red flowering quince towering above it. See? Those microscopic flowers qualify this totally nerdy plant for Bloom Day! Woo-hoo!

Jetfire Narcissus
Narcissus Tete-a-Tete and Jack Snipe
Daphne odora
Daphne odora 'Alba'
Double hellebore
Crocus tommasinianus
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Iris unguicularis
Chaenomeles Atsuya Hamada
Ribes aff wilsonii DJHC 777
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