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ca. 500,000 BCE Mount Hood erupts continually over a period of several hundred years.

ca. 10,000 BCE Native tribes like the Multnomah subsist on slopes and valleys surrounding a mountain they call Wy’East.

1792 (Pictured) British naval lieutenant William Broughton names Mount Hood after his countryman, Admiral Samuel Hood, a man who has never seen the mountain.

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1857 Henry Pittock leads the first documented climb to Mount Hood’s summit (see Lore of the Mountain).

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1887 From a camp at 9,800 feet up the mountain, Will Steel and J.M. Keene set fire to a hundred pounds of lycopodium powder. Watching parties in Portland, McMinnville, Canby, Vancouver, Silverton, and Salem witness the blaze.

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1888 Oregon Alpine Club begins a movement to name Mount Hood a national park. Twenty-eight years later, Oregon senator George Earle Chamberlain authors a bill that would create a 688-square-mile national park encompassing Mount Hood. The bill fails.

1915 (Pictured) US Forest Service erects a fire lookout on Mount Hood’s Summit. Abandoned since 1934, the storm-beaten cabin collapses in 1944.

1915 On a Sunday in early July, Blanche Pechette and Frank Pearce are wed on the mountain’s summit. The bride wears white silk chiffon and carries orange blossoms and lilies of the valley.

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1925 Mt Hood Loop Highway is paved.

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1927 Summit Ski Area opens in Government Camp. Still in operation today, Summit is the oldest ski area in the Pacific Northwest.

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1935 Young architect John Yeon and a group of locals propose the mountain’s first ski lodge, siting their modernist structure on a ridge above Salmon River Canyon so that the winds would "scour" the snow off the building into the canyon beyond. The WPA later opts for a site several hundred feet west, where snow buries the building each winter.

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1937 The Mt Hood Ski Patrol, the nation’s first organized ski patrol, is founded.

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1937 President Franklin Delano Roosevelt dedicates Timberline Lodge. Before the event, a Forest Service photographer, not realizing that press corps rules forbade showing Roosevelt’s handicap, snaps a photo of the disabled commander in chief being helped out of his automobile. The picture remains one of few such images in existence.

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1939 Norway’s Crown Prince Olav dedicates the Magic Mile, Mount Hood’s first chairlift.

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1947 Nine climbers ascend the mountain via the South Side Route. Once on top, they assemble a bicycle and take turns riding around the summit.

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1949 Mt Hood Ski Patrol volunteer Harold Johnson invents the Johnson splint. The simple foam-lined plywood device is used to stabilize leg injuries and is soon copied by every Western ski resort. It is still in use today.

1951 (Pictured) The Skiway Tram—a Portland city bus moving on fixed cables—begins ferrying skiers from Government Camp to Timberline Lodge. Unreliable and expensive, the tram ceases operation in 1956.

1956 Timberline’s much maligned corrugated metal Quonset-hut entrance is constructed in order to prevent the front of the lodge from being buried in snow.

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1967 The mountain’s newest resort, Mt Hood Meadows Ski Area, opens.

1974 (Pictured) Oregon State Highway Department plans for the Mt Hood Freeway are thwarted by a vocal contingent of Southeast Portland residents. Instead, federal highway money is used the seed the development of MAX light-rail.

1978 Portions of The Shining are shot at Timberline Lodge. Confusion about Timberline’s role in the film ensues (see Shine On).

1982 With eight teams participating, the first Hood to Coast Relay takes place.

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2000 (Pictured) USGS fact sheet on Mount Hood says a cataclysmic volcanic event from the mountain is unlikely (but not out of the question).

2004 Portlander Tom Kloster tries to reignite the Mt Hood National Park campaign by launching a website, mounthoodnationalpark.org, dedicated to the cause.

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2009 (Pictured) Hood to Coast is now considered the country’s largest relay race, attracting more than 12,000 runners each year.

2009 Transworld Snowboarding magazine places Mt Hood Meadows’ super pipe on its annual top 10 list of halfpipes.

2009 President Obama’s Ombnibus Public Lands Management Act becomes law. Ron Wyden, chair of the Senate’s Subcommittee on Public Lands and Forests, is credited locally for the bill’s safeguarding of 127,000 acres of the Mt Hood National Forest.

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2009 Still plagued by winter drifts at its front door, Timberline Lodge debuts a high-design, high-tech, igloo-inspired entrance.

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